You Can’t Forget the Past

The following is from the movie The Two Jakes. It was the sequel to Chinatown (1974), and was released in 1990. Actor/director Jack Nicholson reprises his role as J.J. “Jake” Gittes, a private investigator in post-war (late 40’s) Los Angeles. In the following ‘scene’ he is on his way out to see a client in …

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Chuck Mangione: Feels So Good

People were sure a lot happier when I was a teenager. I often wonder if it had anything to do with the music. This song debuted in December of 1977, and you would hear it everywhere. The music of the time was still pleasing, organic and real. Analog, like the phones we used, the books …

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Debussy: Clair de Lune

Debussy plays Debussy | Clair de Lune (1913) 3:50 Description: Claude-Achille Debussy – Clair de Lune (Mondglanz, Mondschein, Moonlight), Suite Bergamasque, Debussy, piano. The Suite bergamasque was first composed in 1890-1905. “Claude Debussy Plays His Finest Works” Claude Debussy, Piano Roll, 1913. NOTE: This is NOT an ACOUSTIC RECORDING. This is a recording obtained by …

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Ben Garrison – The Real Looters

Amen. Once again, thank you Ben Garrison. We’ve seen plenty of looting during the ‘peaceful protests,’ but the looters we saw on TV are amateurs compared to what’s going on at the top.  The Federal Reserve no longer consults Congress to create and distribute their debt currency. Not only has the Fed routinely bailed out …

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Ben Garrison – America’s Far Left Future

I don’t always agree with Ben Garrison politically, but his cartoon from three years ago sure nailed it. The following is from today’s newsletter… WELCOME TO YOUR PROGRESSIVE UTOPIA This cartoon was published nearly three years ago. It predicted our future, which has now arrived in full, ugly bloom. Actually, I’m not much of a …

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Gabriel Faure: Pavane – Orchestral

Another installment in our quest to determine whether some art has intrinsic beauty, or is ‘beautiful’ only because some say or think so. Are there universal truths, and are these truths indeed self-evident? Gabriel FAURE’: Pavane, Op. 50 – Paintings By “CLAUDE MONET” – YouTube 7:04 By Austin Gerth – Classical MPR I’m hard-pressed to …

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A Friendly Reminder from Tommy Toilet

Who would have thought that nearly 50 years after this was first published the nation would once again take this to heart. I suspect this is the real reason for the recent toilet paper panic. Image by R. Crumb More at CRISIS-19 Public Forum Robert Crumb – Wikipedia Welcome to rcrumb.com – The Official Crumb …

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John Denver: Annie’s Song

1973 — I was thinking of the age in which this song was written. It was a time before every emotion was ran through an amplifier and turned into a parody. A time more organic, before even compassion itself was manufactured. You couldn’t yet patent lifeforms. That realm still belonged to God, whether you believed …

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Love is the Answer

1979 – From native Texans Dan Seals and John Coley. Of all the hits they produced, this was Coley’s favorite. Written by Todd Rundgren. 4:44 Love Is The Answer Name your price A ticket to paradise I can’t stay here any more And I’ve looked high and low I’ve been from shore to shore to …

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Eric Clapton: Let It Grow

Another European. A beautiful song with beautiful imagery. I hope you enjoy. There are some striking scenes of the plasma which surrounds the Earth… the aurora borealis. Did you know that Eric Clapton never liked his own singing voice? 5:12 Let It Grow Standing at the crossroads, trying to read the signs To tell me …

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Pachelbel: Canon in D

Written in the late 1600’s for three violins and one cello, Pachelbel’s Canon in D has certainly withstood the test of time. This rendition from Australia, a String Quartet, with three women and one man. Beautiful, on so many levels, if you are able to see and hear it… imbibe it even, while you still …

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JS Bach: “Air” – Orchestral Suite No. 3

Continued, another installment in our push back against the Nihilists that plan to take over the world. This is J.S. Bach’s “Air” from Orchestral Suite No. 3, performed by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic. Some may find it offensive that Bach was European, and a man. Still, I believe that this is another classic representation of …

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Dave Brubeck: Take Five

Dave Brubeck was a classically trained pianist who grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area. In 1951 he formed the Dave Brubeck Quartet with Paul Desmond on alto saxophone. Desmond would eventually compose the following piece, written in 5/4 time. This would go on to be the biggest-selling jazz single of all time. Take …

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The Windmills of Your Mind

A song that celebrates the wonder of romantic love. That spellbinding attraction that exists between the sexes, rich, and organic. It is an emotion truly not describable by words alone… I post here The Thomas Crown Affair (1999) movie version, sung by Mr. Gordon Sumner. It is my own personal favorite. 4:13 The Windmills of …

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Astrud Gilberto: The Girl from Ipanema

Bossa Nova, almost Jazz. “The Girl from Ipanema” (“Garota de Ipanema”) was written in 1962 by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics originally in Portuguese (Jobim was from Brazil). This was recorded by Astrud Gilberto, João Gilberto and Stan Getz, in March 1963 as part of the album Getz/Gilberto, released March 1964 on the Verve label. …

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Erik Satie: Gymnopédies

Here’s one with pictures. Compare this to your favorite slutty half-time show filled with demonic symbolism. Who wins? 15:45 – Special Thanks to Estoy Perdida From the video’s YouTube description… Erik Satie – Gymnopédie No.1 Satie was introduced as a “gymnopedist” in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also …

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Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini

So who will stand the test of time, Rachmaninoff or someone named Dawg? Sadly, that probably depends on the culture. A culture that now looks down, instead of up. And that seems to be the direction we’re going – down. Any culture that glorifies all that is nasty and evil instead of all that is …

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Debussy: Clair de Lune as Art

Another post in our ongoing quest to determine whether there is intrinsic value in great works of art, or whether one person’s turd is just as great as another’s Debussy, well, because someone decided it was… 5:29 – Kathia Buniatishvili – Claude Debussy: Clair de lune For anyone who is actually listening to these, here …

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Delibes: Lakme – Duo des Fleurs

The “Flower Duet” is a famous duet for soprano and mezzo-soprano from Leo Delibes’ opera Lakmé, first performed in Paris in 1883. The duet takes place in Act 1 of the three-act opera, between characters Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika, as they go to gather flowers by a river. …

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