You Can’t Forget the Past

The following is from the movie The Two Jakes. It was the sequel to Chinatown (1974), and was released in 1990. Actor/director Jack Nicholson reprises his role as J.J. “Jake” Gittes, a private investigator in post-war (late 40’s) Los Angeles. In the following ‘scene’ he is on his way out to see a client in …

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Hydrogen from Water as a Power Source

I mused on an old blog years ago that we would probably learn one day that there was more energy locked in the water of our planet’s oceans than anywhere else on Earth. I didn’t think this was some great insight, only that I was picking up on what was already known to the collective …

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Added New Public Group “Daily Musings”

I did some rearranging early this morning to the site’s Groups. The public group Daily News continues to be active and there is a new public group named Daily Musings. The new group is for “Random thoughts that may be stepping stones for larger work or dialogue. Items that do not really belong in the …

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The Most Important Sentence

I have always loved language and languages. “He who does not know another language does not know his own,” said Goethe, and it is so true. Nothing else expands our minds the same way. The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis claims in fact that the language we use to speak (and think) actually affects the way we perceive …

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Easy Test for CV-19

How to tell if you are a carrier of CV-19: Place two fingers on the inside of your wrist just below your thumb, making sure you can feel your pulse. Count the number of heartbeats in 10 seconds. See test results below. Results: If you are able to locate a pulse then you are a …

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Schumann Resonance

Did you know that the Earth has its own vibrational frequency? It does. It is 7.83 Hertz (Hz), and it’s called the Schumann Resonance. When your brain is at its ultimate state of relaxation, like the state you might experience with practiced meditation (not sleep), your brainwaves are operating in this same frequency. It is …

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Debussy: Clair de Lune as Art

Another post in our ongoing quest to determine whether there is intrinsic value in great works of art, or whether one person’s turd is just as great as another’s Debussy, well, because someone decided it was… 5:29 – Kathia Buniatishvili – Claude Debussy: Clair de lune For anyone who is actually listening to these, here …

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Delibes: Lakme – Duo des Fleurs

The “Flower Duet” is a famous duet for soprano and mezzo-soprano from Leo Delibes’ opera Lakmé, first performed in Paris in 1883. The duet takes place in Act 1 of the three-act opera, between characters Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika, as they go to gather flowers by a river. …

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The Call Girl Principle

Sharing a more personal post this evening. I hope you enjoy… The Call Girl Principle states that the value of services diminishes rapidly once those services have been rendered. This principle may take many forms. There is a story about a banquet that was thrown after Columbus returned to Spain, having ‘discovered’ the New World. …

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Thought Reform and the Psychology of Totalism

Thought Reform and the Psychology of Totalism: A Study of “Brainwashing” in China is a non-fiction book by psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton on the psychology of mind control. Lifton’s research for the book began in 1953 with a series of interviews with American servicemen who had been held captive during the Korean War. In addition …

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Dunbar’s Number

Dunbar’s number is the nominal limit to the number of people with whom we may comfortably maintain stable relationships, aka friendships. The number is proposed to be between 100 and 250, with a commonly used value of 150. This number was first put forth in the 1990’s by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar after studying the …

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Seeing the Noise – Living in the Ether

The featured image is a graphical representation of electromagnetic energy filling a space. Wi-Fi. It represents the soup – the ether we now live in. Most of us at least. And it is going to get significantly worse with the introduction of 5G. Many who suffer from tinnitus are in fact experiencing a sensitivity to …

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Epstein and the Eugenicists

The wormhole goes so far beyond where most people are able to conceive. This is the place where science and religion meet. Many have wondered for years why I have harped on Huxley’s Brave New World as much as Orwell’s 1984, noting that what we have been experiencing is in fact a melding of the …

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Brave New World Castes

Alphas and Betas Alphas and Betas are at the top of the caste system, and perform the more intellectual jobs. Unlike the lower castes, Alphas and Betas are not clones, allowing for more individual personalities. Alphas wear gray, and Betas wear mulberry. Examples of Alphas include Thomas, Henry Foster, Mustapha Mond, Bernard Marx, Benito Hoover, …

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How language shapes the way we think

There are many ways to transfer to our fellow humans the things that occur in our minds, whether these are things we think, or things we feel… or, most likely, some combination of both. These occurrences may only appear to emanate from within ourselves and language may take many forms, but these discussions are beyond …

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The Arrow of Time

“Well, time has a kind of strange role in modern physics. It’s not a completely resolved question. The nature of time still has real ambiguities about it. Scientifically we don’t understand why time has one direction, and one direction only. Yes, I can never go backwards, but in space I can go both directions. Always. …

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Eric Raymond’s 17 Unix Rules

In his book The Art of Unix Programming that was first published in 2003, Eric S. Raymond, an American programmer and open source advocate, summarizes the Unix philosophy as the KISS Principle of “Keep it Simple, Stupid.” He provides a series of design rules: Rule of Modularity Developers should build a program out of simple parts …

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All the World’s a Stage

“All the world’s a stage” is the phrase that begins a monologue from William Shakespeare’s As You Like It, spoken by the melancholy Jaques in Act II Scene VII Line 138. The speech compares the world to a stage and life to a play. It catalogues the seven stages of a man’s life, sometimes referred …

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An Expanding Earth

Many years ago we were introduced to the fact that the Universe was expanding. Then more recently it was discovered that the expansion was not slowing down, as had been previously surmised, but was in fact accelerating. So what is the universe? It is easy to get caught up in thinking of the universe as …

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